‘Major’ Decisions: How to Find the Right Field of Study

Some students immediately know what they want to study in college, while others are still undecided as they walk into their first college classroom. It’s fine either way: If you don’t know right away what you want to major in, there are several resources to help you choose.

First, think about what you love to do and the subject matters you excel in, says Benjamin Overbey, an admissions representative at Full Sail University. Have you always wanted to be a graphic designer? Are you interested in animation? “Don’t settle on what you think is easiest,” says Overbey. “Think about life after college and how you want that to feel.”

Research which field of study best complements the career you want. In an article for Time magazine, professional tutor Brian Witte listed English, journalism, marketing, and communications as all viable majors for someone interested in a career in content marketing. Some fields of study are more specialized (such as engineering or game development), but there’s not always one straight and narrow path to a desired career field.

If you’re feeling a little lost determining career goals and which courses to take, The College Board suggests talking to an advisor, such as a guidance counselor or a career development specialist. This person’s job is to help you match your interests and passions with a particular field of study. “Network with people in your prospective field and ask them questions,” suggests Overbey. “Social media [LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram] is a great tool for this.”

And know that it’s okay to change your mind. Many students switch majors after they’re enrolled in college, according to The Princeton Review. (Worth noting: A change in major may require more prerequisite coursework.) Your goal is to discover a career path that satisfies your passions – sometimes you know what that is right away and sometimes you need a little bit of exploration to figure it out.

Outside Resources:

Time

The College Board

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